What I’m Working On Now

 
 
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NEW CULTURES OF REMOTE WARFARE: VISIONS, INTIMACIES, AND RECONFIGURATIONS.

Co-Edited with Rebecca A. Adelman

Under Contract, University of Minnesota Press

New Cultures of Remote Warfare is comprised of thirteen essays that offer novel approaches to the questions provoked by remote warfare, and they propose new and often unanticipated answers. Foregrounding its cultural entanglements, the volume recontextualizes remote warfare beyond the battlefield and explores its implications for cultural production, activism, and social life in both military and civilian spaces. Taken together, these essays expand upon, and in some cases upend, critical orthodoxies about remote warfare, while accounting thoughtfully for its consequences.

Under Contract with University of Minnesota Press

Forthcoming in 2020

 
“Demonstration by Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) demanding "universal, unconditional amenesty" for veterans who served during the Vietnam era in front of the Justice Department in Washington DC (10th St. & Pennsylvania Ave. NW) on July 3, 1974.” This image was scanned from original negatives. ( Reading/Simpson )

“Demonstration by Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) demanding "universal, unconditional amenesty" for veterans who served during the Vietnam era in front of the Justice Department in Washington DC (10th St. & Pennsylvania Ave. NW) on July 3, 1974.” This image was scanned from original negatives. (Reading/Simpson)

Let All The Wounds of War Be Healed­­­: The Amnesty Debate and the Aftermath of the Vietnam War

The debate over whether the men who had refused induction into the armed services during the Vietnam War deserved forgiveness, and if so what kind and how and when it should be administered, thus reveals how deep the wounds of the Vietnam War remained, and how elusive healing would be. Somewhat surprisingly, however, this issue has never received a book-length scholarly treatment. My current book project, Let All The Wounds of War Be Healed­­­: The Amnesty Debate and the Aftermath of the Vietnam War, will tell this story. Drawing on research from dozens of archives as well as media coverage and popular culture, it will explore how a range of stakeholders used this issue to debate the contours of citizenship, the relationship between the military and society, and the United States’ place in the world in the late twentieth century.